Can Urban Greening Improve Health in the U.S. and Canada? - Postponed Until Further Notice

Thu, March 19, 2020 3:30 PM - Thu, March 19, 2020 5:00 PM at International Center, Room 201

MSU Canadian Partnership Forum (Sponsored by MSU Canadian Studies Center)

Can Urban Greening Improve Health in the U.S. and Canada?

Dr. Amber Pearson, Michigan State University, Department of Geography, Environment and Spatial Sciences

Dr. Michael Widener, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

 

Abstract:

A recent survey in Canada reported that 75% of respondents found it easier to stay indoors, even though there appear to be important chronic health benefits to spending time outdoors. Dr. Amber Pearson and Dr. Michael Widener will review the evidence on the health benefits of spending time outdoors and engaging with nature.

 

Bios:

Dr. Amber Pearson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography, Environment and Spatial Sciences at Michigan State University and an Adjunct Fellow in the Department of Public Health at the University of Otago. Dr. Pearson is a health geographer with a focus on social justice and intersections between spatial and social features of neighborhoods. Specifically, her research relates to aspects of the neighborhood built, physical and social environment that may bolster opportunities for a healthy life, often in the face of socioeconomic adversity. Her overall research goal is to understand the interactions between humans and their neighborhoods to improve health and wellbeing while paying careful attention to health inequalities and environmental justice. She teaches quantitative methods, health and the environment and graduate seminar courses.

 

Dr. Michael Widener is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography and Planning at the University of Toronto and the Canada Research Chair (Tier 2) in Transportation and Health. He is also affiliated with several institutes and committees including the University of Toronto Transportation and Research Institute and the Network for European Communication and Transport Activity Research (NECTAR) Social and Health Committee. Dr. Widener’s research explores how transportation networks and infrastructure affect people’s ability to acquire and maintain access to health services and healthy opportunities.