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We provide funding opportunities for faculty across multiple disciplines, from multiple sources.

In the new Grid View, we have tried to make it easier to find opportunities relevant to your interests. Opportunities have been filtered by governmental agencies and research areas. Click a button to view information at an "intersection". The numbers indicate how many opportunities currently available.

In List View, all opportunities are displayed catagorized by agencies. Please contact us at (espp@msu.edu) with questions or comments.

 

  DoD DoE DoI EPA FDN INTL NASA NIH/CDC NOAA NSF USAID USDA Others
Climate 1

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Decision Making 1

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Ecosystems 1

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6 1

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Education & Communications 1

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Energy 1 1

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Food 1

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Human Health 1

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Land 2

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Water 1

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Other Themes of Sustainability 1

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External Funding Opportunities

Department of Agriculture

Rural Cooperative Development Grant Department of Agriculture Business and Cooperative Programs RDBCP-RCDG-2018
The primary objective of the RCDG program is to improve the economic condition of rural areas by assisting individuals or entities in the startup, expansion or operational improvement of rural cooperatives and other business entities. Grants are awarded competitively on an annual basis to Rural Cooperative Development Centers who in turn provide technical assistance to individuals and entities.
July 24, 2018

USDA-NIFA-AFRI-006351 Agriculture and Food Research Initiative - Foundational Program Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture
The AFRI Foundational Program is offered to support grants in the six AFRI priority areas to continue building a foundation of knowledge critical for solving current and future societal challenges. The six priority areas are: Plant Health and Production and Plant Products; Animal Health and Production and Animal Products; Food Safety, Nutrition, and Health; Bioenergy, Natural Resources, and Environment; Agriculture Systems and Technology; and Agriculture Economics and Rural Communities. Single-function Research Projects, multi-function Integrated Projects, and Food and Agricultural Science Enhancement (FASE) Grants are expected to address one of the Program Area Priorities (see Foundational Program RFA for details).
September 30th, 2018

USDA-NIFA-AFRI-006351 Agriculture and Food Research Initiative - Foundational Program Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture
The AFRI Foundational Program is offered to support grants in the six AFRI priority areas to continue building a foundation of knowledge critical for solving current and future societal challenges. The six priority areas are: Plant Health and Production and Plant Products; Animal Health and Production and Animal Products; Food Safety, Nutrition, and Health; Bioenergy, Natural Resources, and Environment; Agriculture Systems and Technology; and Agriculture Economics and Rural Communities. Single-function Research Projects, multi-function Integrated Projects, and Food and Agricultural Science Enhancement (FASE) Grants are expected to address one of the Program Area Priorities (see Foundational Program RFA for details).
September 30th, 2018

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Department of Defense

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Academic Research Program HM0476-18-BAA-0001
NGA welcomes all innovative ideas for path-breaking research that may advance the GEOINT mission. The NGA mission is to provide timely, relevant, and accurate geospatial intelligence (GEOINT) in support of national security objectives. GEOINT is the exploitation and analysis of imagery and geospatial information to describe, assess, and visually depict physical features and geographically referenced activities on the Earth. GEOINT consists of imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial information. NGA offers a variety of critical GEOINT products in support of U.S. national security objectives and Federal disaster relief, including aeronautical, geodesy, hydrographic, imagery, geospatial and topographical information. The NGA Academic Research Program (NARP) is focused on innovative, far-reaching basic and applied research in science, technology, engineering and mathematics having the potential to advance the GEOINT mission. The objective of the NARP is to support innovative, high-payoff research that provides the basis for revolutionary progress in areas of science and technology affecting the needs and mission of NGA. This research also supports the National System for Geospatial Intelligence (NSG), which is the combination of technology, systems and organizations that gather, produce, distribute and consume geospatial data and information. This research is aimed at advancing GEOINT capabilities by improving analytical methods, enhancing and expanding systems capabilities, and leveraging resources for common NSG goals. The NARP also seeks to improve education in scientific, mathematics, and engineering skills necessary to advance GEOINT capabilities. It is NGA's intent to solicit fundamental research under this BAA. Fundamental research means basic and applied research in science and engineering, the results of which ordinarily are published and shared broadly within the scientific community, as distinguished from proprietary research and from Industrial development, design, production, and product utilization, the results of which ordinarily are restricted for proprietary or national security reason. (National Security Decision Directive (NSDD) 189, National Policy on the Transfer of Scientific, Technical, and Engineering Information).NGA seeks proposals from eligible U.S. institutions for path-breaking GEOINT research in areas of potential interest to NGA, the DoD, and the Intelligence Community (IC).
Dec. 31, 2018

NRL Wide Broad Agency Announcement - DOD BAA-N00173-02
The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is the Navy's corporate laboratory. NRL conducts basic and applied research for the Navy in a variety of scientific and technical disciplines. The basic research program is driven by perceptions about future requirements of the Navy.
NOTE: Closing date is not necessary due to continuous update to solicitation requirements.

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Department of Energy

DE-FOA-0001412: HYDROGEN AND FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND DEMONSTRATIONS
The Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) is a key component of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) portfolio. FCTO aims to provide clean, safe, secure, affordable, and reliable energy from diverse domestic resources, providing the benefits of increased energy security and reduced criteria pollutants and green-house gas emissions by adopting a technology–neutral approach towards applied research, development, and demonstration to address both key technical challenges for fuel cells and hydrogen fuels (i.e. hydrogen production, delivery and storage) and institutional barriers such as hydrogen codes and standards.
Varies by Area of Interest

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Department of Health and Human Services - National Institutes of Health and Centers for Disease Control

Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats (CounterACT) Exploratory/Development Projects in Translational Research PAR-18-721
his Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages applications for Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats (CounterACT) exploratory/developmental translational research (R21). The mission of the CounterACT program is to foster and support research and development of new and improved therapeutics to mitigate the health effects of chemical threats. Chemical threats are toxic chemicals that could be used in a terrorist attack or accidentally released from industrial production, storage or shipping. They include traditional chemical warfare agents, toxic industrial chemicals, pesticides, and pharmaceutical-based agents. The scope of the research includes basic toxicological research on the chemical threat for the purpose of target and therapeutic hit identification, hit validation, lead optimization, and demonstration of in vivo ADME/Tox and efficacy. Projects supported by this FOA are expected to generate preliminary data that would facilitate the development of competitive applications for more extensive support from the NIH CounterACT Cooperative Agreement programs or other related initiatives.
May 26, 2020

Outstanding New Environmental Scientist (ONES) Award (R01 Clinical Trial Optional) RFA-ES-18-001
The Outstanding New Environmental Scientist (ONES) Award is intended to identify the most talented Early Stage Investigators (ESIs) who intend to make a long-term commitment to research in the Environmental Health Sciences and assist them in launching an innovative research program focused on the understanding of environmental exposure effects on peoples health.
Feb. 28, 2020

PAR-18-206 Bioengineering Research Grants (BRG) (R01 Clinical Trial Optional) Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health
The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement is to encourage collaborations between the life and physical sciences that: 1) apply a multidisciplinary bioengineering approach to the solution of a biomedical problem; and 2) integrate, optimize, validate, translate or otherwise accelerate the adoption of promising tools, methods and techniques for a specific research or clinical problem in basic, translational, or clinical science and practice. An application may propose design-directed, developmental, discovery-driven, or hypothesis-driven research and is appropriate for small teams applying an integrative approach to increase our understanding of and solve problems in biological, clinical or translational science.
May 7, 2019

PAR-18-727 Food Specific Molecular Profiles and Biomarkers of Food and Nutrient Intake, and Dietary Exposure (R01 Clinical Trial Optional) Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health
The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to promote research on food specific molecular signatures and biomarkers of dietary consumption and to promote collaborative interactions among NIH and USDA supported nutrition researchers.
September 27th, 2019

Research to Action: Assessing and Addressing Community Exposures to Environmental Contaminants PA-16-083
This Funding Opportunity Announcement encourages applications using community-engaged research methods to investigate the potential health risks of environmental exposures of concern to the community and to implement an environmental public health action plan based on research findings. The overall goal is to support changes to prevent or reduce exposure to harmful environmental exposures and improve the health of a community.
May 7, 2019

RFA-ES-17-003 Environmental Health Sciences Core Centers (EHS CC) (P30) Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health
This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites grant applications for Environmental Health Sciences Core Centers (EHS CC). As intellectual hubs for environmental health research, the EHS CC is expected to be the thought leaders for the field and advance the goals of the NIEHS Strategic Plan (http://www.niehs.nih.gov/about/strategicplan/). The Core Centers provide critical research infrastructure, shared facilities, services and /or resources, to groups of investigators conducting environmental health sciences research. An EHS CC enables researchers to conduct their independently-funded individual and/or collaborative research projects more efficiently and/or more effectively. The broad overall goal of an EHS CC is to identify and capitalize on emerging issues that advance improving the understanding of the relationships among environmental exposures, human biology, and disease. The EHS CC supports community engagement and translational research as key approaches to improving public health.
April 17, 2019

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Department of Interior - Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service and US Geological Survey

2019 Multistate Conservation Grant Program Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service F18AS00142
The Sport Fish Restoration Act and the Wildlife Restoration Act, as amended by the Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Programs Improvement Act of 2000 (Pub. L. 106-408) authorize the Secretary of the Interior to make up to $6,000,000 available annually under the Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program (WSFR) for the purpose of funding multistate conservation project grants. The primary goal of the MSCGP is to provide grant funds to address regional or national priority needs (National Conservation Needs or NCNs) of the State fish and wildlife agencies (States) and their partners that are beyond the scope and capabilities of a single State. Projects awarded funding are published annually in the Federal Register.
Aug. 3, 2018

Fox River Natural Resource Damage Assessment Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service F18AS00023
The Fox River Green Bay Natural Resource Trustees restore natural resources injured by the release of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) into the Lower Fox River and Green Bay, WI. The Trustees allocate funding, provided by settlement dollars from responsible parties, to restoration projects that fulfill the natural resource objectives of the 2003 Joint Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment for The Lower Fox River and Green Bay Area and the 2016 Restoration Plan Update under the authority of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act. The Lower Fox River Green Bay NRDA is not a conventional grants program, in that it does not solicit for projects through a formal request for proposals on Grants.gov; instead project idea forms are developed strategically in coordination with the Trustee Council. Following the review process, if a project is selected a grant will be awarded. The Service will also award single source grant agreements based on the criteria outlined in Section VI without competition under justification 505DM 2.14.B.4 as appropriate. Applicants seeking funding under this program should review the requirements and selection criteria and contact the restoration coordinator to discuss their project concept prior to submitting an application for funding.
Sept. 30, 2018

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, Partners for Fish and Wildlife 2018- F18AS00051
The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative targets the most significant environmental problems in the Great Lakes ecosystem by funding and implementing federal projects that address these problems. One goal is to improve habitat and wildlife protection and restoration. Using appropriations from the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), Partners for Fish and Wildlife (PFW) Program anticipates funding wetland (both coastal and interior) and associated upland habitat restoration and enhancement projects for conservation of native Great Lakes fish and wildlife populations, particularly migratory birds and, as appropriate, federally-listed species. Restoration projects will be completed on privately owned (non-federal/non-state) lands. Emphasis will be placed on, but not limited to, completing projects within the watersheds of Great Lakes Areas of Concern and in coastal zones. The PFW Program is a voluntary, incentive-based program that provides direct technical assistance and financial assistance in the form of cooperative agreements to private landowners to restore and conserve fish and wildlife habitat for the benefit of federal trust resources. In the Great Lakes watershed, PFW biologists from eight states coordinate with project partners, stakeholders, and other Service programs to identify geographic focus areas and develop habitat conservation priorities within these focus areas. Geographic focus areas are where the PFW Program directs resources to conserve habitat for federal trust species. Project work plans are developed strategically, in coordination with partners, and with substantial involvement from Service field staff. Projects must advance our mission, promote biological diversity, and be based upon sound scientific biological principles. Program strategic plans inform the types of projects funded under this opportunity. Applicants seeking funding under this program should review the program strategic plan and also contact the PFW state coordinator PRIOR TO submitting an application for funding.
Sept. 30, 2018

White-Nose Syndrome Research Grants FY18 Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service F18AS00119
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is pleased to announce the availability of research funding in 2018 to investigate issues related directly to the management of white-nose syndrome (WNS). The WNS Program provides financial and technical assistance to non-governmental, university, and private researchers, as well as state and local governments, Native American tribes, and federal agencies, for the management of WNS and conservation of bats. Funded projects will investigate priority questions about WNS to improve our ability to manage the disease and implement management actions that will help to conserve affected bat species.
Sept. 30, 2018

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Environmental Protection Agency

Advancing Actionable Alternatives to Vertebrate Animal Testing for Chemical Safety Assessment Request for Applications
EPA, as part of its Science to Achieve Results (STAR) program, is seeking applications proposing research that will promote the development and use of alternative test methods and strategies that address the "3Rs" of toxicity testing: 1) reduce, 2) refine, and/or 3) replace vertebrate animal testing. For the purposes of this RFA, alternative test methods refer to those that incorporate the "3Rs" principles. Pertinent research includes approaches such as analog/read-across techniques, mathematical models, and tiered testing approaches that integrate evidence from multiple sources to help accomplish these goals. While the present solicitation invites development of new alternative test methods and strategies, translational science that use available data to develop and/or advance actionable approaches for risk assessment of chemicals is critical. In this context, approaches that facilitate the use of existing animal data sources to reduce, refine, or replace the need for new vertebrate animal tests are as welcome as those that provide new data streams. The research activities to be funded under this announcement are intended to advance the science underpinning the use of non-vertebrate test methods, and to develop actionable alternative approaches to: 1) developmental toxicity tests in humans; 2) reproductive toxicity tests in humans, and/or 3) ecotoxicity tests.
Sept. 25, 2018

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Foundations

2019 FUTURE FOR NATURE AWARD
The new round for the 2019 Future For Nature Awards is open now! Are you a young (under 35 years old), talented and inspiring conservationist, committed to protecting species of wild animals and plants by combining passion with action to create concrete results in nature conservation? Do not hesitate and apply for the Future For Nature Award 2019! Do you know someone who deserves to be honoured with this award? Please bring the Future For Nature Award to his/her attention or send in an application for him or her. Please take note: the Future For Nature prizes will be awarded to individuals, not to organizations; 100 percent of the prize money should be used towards a conservation project of the winners' own choice.
Sept. 16, 2018

Columbus Zoo and Aquarium Connservation Grants
Established more than 25 years ago, the Columbus Zoo Fund for Conservation has helped hundreds of dedicated wildlife heroes across the globe protect threatened and endangered animals and their critical habitats. Each year the Zoo awards 70 grants to projects in 30 countries. The Columbus Zoo makes conservation grants for research, local community involvement, capacity building, environmental education, and behavior change leading to improved conservation of wildlife and habitat. Grant requests may range from US$1 thousand to US$25 thousand, but grants are limited to US$5 thousand for first-time applicants.
Sept. 15, 2018

Foundation Segré: (Call for Concept Papers) Wildlife Conservation
Fondation Segré focuses on the conservation of threatened species and their habitat, and the restoration of degraded ecosystems. It supports conservation projects around the world – including in the developing regions of Africa; Latin America and the Caribbean; Asia-Pacific; and Europe and the Middle East. The Foundation welcomes proposals anytime in the preliminary form of a brief concept. If the concept is approved by the Foundation, the proponent will be invited to submit a full proposal. Proposals are welcome anytime in the preliminary form of a concept of no more than 2,000 words.
Proposals are welcome anytime.

John Ball Zoo's Wildlife Conservation Fund
The John Ball Zoological Society makes grants to conserve wild animals and their habitats; to improve the management of captive animals; and to develop education programs related to these objectives. Many projects funded by the Wildlife Conservation Fund have been education based with an eye to helping communities learn about the wildlife around them.
Sept. 4, 2018

KR Foundation Grant for Long-term Impact on our Climate and Environment
The mission of KR Foundation is to help provide answers to, stimulate mind shifts about, and encourage action on, the long-term challenges faced by current and future generations living on a planet with finite resources, fragile ecosystems, and climate change. As a philanthropic foundation, KR Foundation typically engages in areas where neither governments nor markets actors seem to have incentives to act. Not restricted by short-term considerations and profit concerns, KR Foundation engages in non-profit activities with long-term impact on our climate and environment.
Proposal accepted on an ongoing basis.

National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Seabird Conservation Program
The overlap of seabirds and humans on oceanic islands and in the marine environment has driven many species to the brink of extinction. Consequently, a major challenge to effective seabird conservation is to mitigate human-induced threats at multiple temporal and spatial scales; in other words, to protect and restore habitats utilized by seabirds throughout the entire life cycle (on both land and at sea). The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation has released this RFP for research that will focus on several geographies within the Pacific, including the following priority regions: Alaska, Chile, California Current (including Mexico), Hawaii and US overseas lands and territories in the Pacific. All proposals must specifically address how projects will directly and measurably contribute to the Pacific seabird program business plan goals.
August 16, 2018

National Geographic: Big Cats Initiative
Proposals including any of the following criteria are encouraged: • Innovative projects with results for saving big cats in the wild • Anti-poaching programs • Interventions leading to declines in big cat mortality • Projects that test new technology • Educational projects focused on community • Projects that establish economic incentives for local people to ensure long-term survival of big cats
No deadline

Waitt Foundation: Rapid Ocean Conservation Grants
The Waitt Foundation makes the Rapid Ocean Conservation (ROC) grants to strengthen and expand marine protected areas, and to promote sustainable fisheries. Grants support scientific research, policy, management, and public awareness. The proposed project must support sustainable fishing and/or marine protected areas. There are no geographical restrictions.
Proposals are reviewed on a monthly basis throughout the year

Whitley Wildlife Conservation Trust: Reptile & Amphibian Conservation Grant
The Whitley Wildlife Conservation Trust awards a number of grants to individuals undertaking nature conservation projects in the UK and internationally (mainly developing countries). Projects may involve practical habitat or species management, research, training, education, awareness raising or campaigning. The current funding opportunity is for reptile and amphibian conservation.
Oct. 31, 2018

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National Science Foundation

17-513 Long Term Research in Environmental Biology National Science Foundation
The Long Term Research in Environmental Biology (LTREB) Program supports the generation of extended time series of data to address important questions in evolutionary biology, ecology, and ecosystem science. Research areas include, but are not limited to, the effects of natural selection or other evolutionary processes on populations, communities, or ecosystems; the effects of interspecific interactions that vary over time and space; population or community dynamics for organisms that have extended life spans and long turnover times; feedbacks between ecological and evolutionary processes; pools of materials such as nutrients in soils that turn over at intermediate to longer time scales; and external forcing functions such as climatic cycles that operate over long return intervals. The Program intends to support decadal projects. Funding for an initial, 5-year period requires submission of a preliminary proposal and, if invited, submission of a full proposal that includes a 15-page project description. Proposals for the second five years of support (renewal proposals) are limited to a ten-page project description and do not require a preliminary proposal. Continuation of an LTREB project beyond an initial ten year award will require submission of a new preliminary proposal that presents a new decadal research plan. Successful LTREB proposals address three essential components:

A Decadal Research Plan that clearly articulates important questions that cannot be addressed with data that have already been collected, but could be answered if ten additional years of data were collected. This plan is not a research timeline or management plan. It is a concise justification for ten years of support in order to advance understanding of key concepts, questions, or theories in environmental biology.

Core Data: LTREB proposals require that the author has studied a particular phenomenon or process for at least six years up to the present and for long enough to generate a contemporary time series that contains at least six data points. These data constitute Core Data on which theproposed projectis based. Analysis of these data should generate new questions, on the same phenomena or processes, that cannot be answered with the existing core data, require ten years of additional data to be answered, and that therefore provide the focus of the LTREB project. Requirements for core data are described in more detail in the solicitation. Please read these carefully.

A Plan for Data Management and Dissemination that details information management and plans for data sharing with the broader research community and the interested public. Data from long-term research projects have value beyond the peer-reviewed and other publications generated by the investigators collecting the data. Specific review criteria for LTREB proposals and renewals are explained in Section VI of the current program solicitation. Prospective applicants are advised to read this solicitation carefully. All proposals submitted to the LTREB program are co-reviewed by participating Clusters in the Division of Environmental Biology: Ecosystem Science, Population and Community Ecology, and Evolutionary Processes.Proposals must address topics supported by these programs. Researchers who are uncertain about the suitability of their project for the LTREB Program are encouraged to contact the cognizant Program Officer. The Division of Integrative Organismal Systems (IOS) no longer accepts proposals submitted to the LTREB solicitation. Long-term projects that address questions of a) development, mechanisms, adaptive value, or evolutionary history of behavior, b) mechanisms and processes mediating antagonistic and beneficial symbioses, c) growth, development, stress adaptation mechanisms, energetics and metabolism, or other physiological processes, and d) structural and physiological traits that underlie organisms' capacities to live in various environments will no longer be supported through LTREB. Core IOS programs supporting all of these areas will entertain proposals based on long-term data http://nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503623&org=IOS&from=home.
August 2nd, 2018

Aeronomy NSF PD 98-1521
The Aeronomy Program supports research from the mesosphere to the outer reaches of the thermosphere and all regions of the Earth's ionosphere. The Aeronomy Program seeks to understand phenomena of ionization, recombination, chemical reaction, photo emission, and the transport of energy, and momentum within and between these regions. The program also supports research into the coupling of this global system to the stratosphere below and magnetosphere above and the plasma physics of phenomena manifested in the coupled ionosphere-magnetosphere system, including the effects of high-power radio wave modification. The Coupling, Energetics, and Dynamics of Atmospheric Regions (CEDAR) Program aims to understand changes in the atmosphere over short and long time scales. CEDAR is consistent with the recommendations and goals of the NAS Decadal Survey "Solar and Space Physics: A Science for a Technological Society". A primary goal of CEDAR is to explain how energy is transferred between atmospheric regions by combining a comprehensive observational program with theoretical and empirical modeling efforts. A data base of CEDAR observations is maintained for community use. The annual CEDAR Workshop attracts over 300 scientists including a large number of graduate students and as well as many international collaborators. There are no deadlines or target dates for proposals sent in to any of the Geospace Section core programs. However, we recommend that PIs try to send in proposals early in the fiscal year.
No deadlines.

Arctic Natural Sciences NSF 16-595
The Arctic Natural Sciences (ANS) Program supports disciplinary and interdisciplinary research related to arctic processes, with particular emphasis on understanding the changing arctic environment. The Program encourages proposals that test hypotheses leading to new understanding of the Arctic and the development of predictive tools. Although proposals to perform monitoring per se are discouraged, the program welcomes proposals that synthesize and analyze historical data
Proposals Accepted Anytime

Atmospheric Chemistry – NSF PD 98-1524
Supports research to measure and model the concentration and distribution of gases and aerosols in the lower and middle atmosphere. Also supports research on the chemical reactions among atmospheric species; the sources and sinks of important trace gases and aerosols; the aqueous-phase atmospheric chemistry; the transport of gases and aerosols throughout the atmosphere; and the improved methods for measuring the concentrations of trace species and their fluxes into and out of the atmosphere.
Proposals accepted anytime.

Biological Oceanography
The Biological Oceanography Program supports research in marine ecology broadly defined: relationships among aquatic organisms and their interactions with the environments of the oceans or Great Lakes. Projects submitted to the program for consideration are often interdisciplinary efforts that may include participation by other OCE Programs.
Aug. 15, 2018

Chemical Oceanography PD 98-1670
The Chemical Oceanography Program supports research into the chemistry of the oceans and the role of the oceans in global geochemical cycles. Areas of interest include chemical composition, speciation, and transformation; chemical exchanges between the oceans and other components of the Earth system; internal cycling in oceans, seas, and estuaries; and the use of measured chemical distributions as indicators of physical, biological, and geological processes.
Aug. 15, 2018

Climate and Large-Scale Dynamics National Science Foundaiton PD-06-5740
The goals of the Program are to: (i) advance knowledge about the processes that force and regulate the atmosphere’s synoptic and planetary circulation, weather and climate, and (ii) sustain the pool of human resources required for excellence in synoptic and global atmospheric dynamics and climate research. Research topics include theoretical, observational and modeling studies of the general circulation of the stratosphere and troposphere; synoptic scale weather phenomena; processes that govern climate; the causes of climate variability and change; methods to predict climate variations; extended weather and climate predictability; development and testing of parameterization of physical processes; numerical methods for use in large-scale weather and climate models; the assembly and analysis of instrumental and/or modeled weather and climate data; data assimilation studies; development and use of climate models to diagnose and simulate climate and its variations and change. Some Climate and Large Scale Dynamics (CLD) proposals address multidisciplinary problems and are often co-reviewed with other NSF programs, some of which, unlike CLD, use panels in addition to mail reviewers, and thus have target dates or deadlines. Proposed research that spans in substantive ways topics appropriate to programs in other divisions at NSF, e.g., ocean sciences, ecological sciences, hydrological sciences, geography and regional sciences, applied math and statistics, etc., must be submitted at times consistent with target dates or deadlines established by those programs. If it's not clear whether your proposed research is appropriate for co-review, please contact CLD staff.
Proposals accepted anytime

Dear Colleague Letter: Behavioral & Economic Sciences (NSF/SBE) and US-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF) Opportunity for Collaborations in Economics and Psychology
International collaborations are invited to submit proposals in the areas described in the following SBE programs: Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences Core Programs: Social Psychology (PD 98-1332) Perception, Action, and Cognition (PD 09-7252) Cognitive Neuroscience (PD 15-1699) Developmental and Learning Sciences (PD 08-1698) Division of Social and Economic Sciences Core Programs: Economics (PD 98-1320) Decision, Risk and Management Sciences (PD 98-1321) NOTE: Only proposals focused on Decision Science are eligible to submit to this call. Proposals on Risk and Management Science are not eligible to participate in this collaborative opportunity. Proposals will be submitted to NSF, and the Israeli institution will submit a parallel proposal to BSF immediately afterwards. The proposals will be reviewed in competition with other proposals received for the same funding round by NSF using NSF's merit review process. It is important to note that there are no separate NSF funds available for these efforts; proposals must compete with all other proposals within the NSF program and must succeed on the strengths of their intellectual merit and broader impact. BSF will check the role of the Israeli scientist and her/his eligibility at the onset of the process, but will not conduct a parallel review and will not rank proposals; BSF is likely to fund any Israeli whose research partner is funded by NSF.
None

Dear Colleague Letter: FY 2017 Sustainable Chemistry, Engineering, and Materials (SusChEm) Funding Opportunity
In fiscal year (FY) 2013, NSF started an initiative to encourage and foster research in Sustainable Chemistry, Engineering, and Materials (SusChEM), partially in response to the mandate of the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010. The SusChEM initiative addresses the interrelated challenges of sustainable supply, engineering, production, and use of chemicals and materials. In FY 2017, the participating divisions are Chemistry (CHE); Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems (CBET); Materials Research (DMR); Earth Science (EAR); and the Materials Engineering and Processing Program in the Division of Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation (CMMI).
Varies.

Dear Colleague Letter: Integrated NSF Support Promoting Interdisciplinary Research and Education (INSPIRE) NSF16-023
The Integrated NSF Support Promoting Interdisciplinary Research and Education (INSPIRE) pilot continues to support bold interdisciplinary projects in all NSF-supported areas of science, engineering, and education research in FY16. INSPIRE has no targeted themes and serves as a funding mechanism for proposals that are required both to be interdisciplinary and to exhibit potentially transformative research (IDR and PTR, respectively). Complementing existing NSF efforts, INSPIRE was created to handle proposals whose: Scientific advances lie outside the scope of a single program or discipline, such that substantial funding support from more than one program or discipline is necessary. Lines of research promise transformational advances. Prospective discoveries reside at the interfaces of disciplinary boundaries that may not be recognized through traditional review or co-review.
No deadline.

Dear Colleague Letter: Special Guidelines for Submitting Collaborative Proposals under the Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems-Engineering and pHysical Sciences Research Council UK Lead Agency Activity
The Directorate for Engineering (ENG), Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental and Transport Systems (CBET) of the National Science Foundation and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council UK (EPSRC) are pleased to announce the CBET-EPSRC Lead Agency Activity under a NSF/RCUK Research Cooperation Memorandum of Understanding (MoU). The goal of this activity is to reduce some of the barriers that researchers currently encounter when working internationally. The CBET-EPSRC Lead Agency Activity will allow US and UK researchers to submit a single collaborative proposal that will undergo a single review process.
No deadline

Dear Colleague Letter: Updated Focus of Programs within the Engineering Biology and Health Cluster, Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental and Transport (CBET) Systems
The Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems (CBET) has realigned and refocused several of the programs within its Engineering Biology and Health cluster. This effort was undertaken to clarify the scope of each of the programs and to minimize programmatic overlap.
No deadline.

Developing Country Collaborations in Plant Genome Research (CDD-PGR) NSF04-563
he Developing Country Collaborations in Plant Genome Research (DCC-PGR) is an addendum to the NSF Program Solicitation, NSF 04-510, Plant Genome Research Program (PGRP) (http://www.nsf.gov/pubsys/ods/getpub.cfm?nsf04510). The intent of DCC-PGR awards is to support collaborative research linking US researchers with partners from developing countries to solve problems of mutual interest in agriculture, energy and the environment, while placing US and international researchers at the center of a global network of scientific excellence. The long-term goal of these collaborative research efforts is a greater and sustained engagement with developing countries in plant biotechnology research. In order to realize the full potential of biotechnology for the developing world, the technology must target crops grown locally in the developing countries and the traits that are most relevant to the local farmers and consumers. At the same time, proposals should meet the broad goals of the PGRP described in the current Program Solicitation. Of special interest are those research projects that build on prior PGRP investments and that tackle problems specific to crops grown in the developing world. A request for supplemental funding should be made under an existing PGRP award. Support can also be requested within a proposal for a new or renewal PGRP award. Proposed collaborative activities are encouraged that focus on research problems important to developing countries and that include scientist-to-scientist interactions potentially leading to long-term partnerships among participating laboratories. The exchange of ideas and people should be reciprocal and should be built on equal partnerships among U.S. scientists and scientists of developing nations. Examples of activities to be supported would include, but not be limited to: joint research projects; and long-term (1 year) or short-term (1-3 months) exchange visits that are reciprocal exchanges of investigators and students between the US and developing countries. Collaborations should be developed that bring complementary sets of expertise to bear on problems of importance to the participants from developing countries, and that meet their identified needs.
None.

Developing Country Collaborations in Plant Genome Research (DCC-PGR) 04-563
This letter is to call your attention to a new activity that will support research collaboration between US scientists and scientists in developing countries as part of ongoing or new Plant Genome Research Program awards. The Developing Country Collaborations in Plant Genome Research (DCC-PGR) is an addendum to the NSF Program Solicitation, NSF 04-510, Plant Genome Research Program (PGRP) (http://www.nsf.gov/pubsys/ods/getpub.cfm?nsf04510). The intent of DCC-PGR awards is to support collaborative research linking US researchers with partners from developing countries to solve problems of mutual interest in agriculture, energy and the environment, while placing US and international researchers at the center of a global network of scientific excellence. The long-term goal of these collaborative research efforts is a greater and sustained engagement with developing countries in plant biotechnology research. In order to realize the full potential of biotechnology for the developing world, the technology must target crops grown locally in the developing countries and the traits that are most relevant to the local farmers and consumers. At the same time, proposals should meet the broad goals of the PGRP described in the current Program Solicitation. Of special interest are those research projects that build on prior PGRP investments and that tackle problems specific to crops grown in the developing world. A request for supplemental funding should be made under an existing PGRP award. Support can also be requested within a proposal for a new or renewal PGRP award. Proposed collaborative activities are encouraged that focus on research problems important to developing countries and that include scientist-to-scientist interactions potentially leading to long-term partnerships among participating laboratories. The exchange of ideas and people should be reciprocal and should be built on equal partnerships among U.S. scientists and scientists of developing nations. Examples of activities to be supported would include, but not be limited to: joint research projects; and long-term (1 year) or short-term (1-3 months) exchange visits that are reciprocal exchanges of investigators and students between the US and developing countries. Collaborations should be developed that bring complementary sets of expertise to bear on problems of importance to the participants from developing countries, and that meet their identified needs.
No fixed deadline.

Earth Sciences: Instrumentation and Facilities 15-516
The Instrumentation and Facilities Program in the Division of Earth Sciences (EAR/IF) supports meritorious requests for infrastructure that promotes research and education in areas supported by the Division (see http://www.nsf.gov/div/index.jsp?div=EAR). EAR/IF will consider proposals for: 1) Acquisition or Upgrade of Research Equipment that will advance laboratory and field investigations and student research training opportunities in the Earth sciences. The maximum request is $750,000. The maximum request for upgrade of research group computing facilities is $75,000. 2) Development of New Instrumentation, Techniques or Software that will extend current research and research training capabilities in the Earth sciences. The maximum request is $750,000. 3) Support of National or Regional Multi-User Facilities that will make complex and expensive instruments, systems of instruments or services broadly available to the Earth science research and student communities. 4) Support for Early Career Investigators to facilitate expedient development and operation of new research infrastructure proposed by the next generation of leaders in the Earth Sciences. The Early Career opportunity specifically allows for submission of a proposal for Acquisition or Upgrade of Research Equipment or Development of New Instrumentation, Techniques or Software which may include additional budget line items associated with support of a new full-time technician who will be dedicated to manage, operate and maintain the instrument(s) being requested. Any request for technical support under this opportunity is limited to three years duration. The maximum total request is $1,000,000. Planned research uses of requested instruments, software, and facilities must include basic research on Earth processes SUPPORTED BY CORE PROGRAMS OR SPECIAL PROGRAMS OF THE DIVISION OF EARTH SCIENCES (see http://www.nsf.gov/div/index.jsp?div=EAR for a current list of programs funded by the Division of Earth Sciences). Support is available through grants or cooperative agreements awarded in response to investigator-initiated proposals. Human resource development and education are expected to be an integral part of all proposals submitted to EAR/IF. Efforts to support participation of underrepresented groups in laboratory and/or field instrument use and training are encouraged. All proposers to EAR/IF are encouraged to consider Support of Outreach and/or Broadening Participation Activities. Proposals submitted to the EAR/IF Program may request up to $20,000 for such activities (please refer to Sections V.A Proposal Preparation Instructions and V.B Budgetary Information). Proposals for Support of National or Regional Multi-User Facilities are excluded from the $20,000 maximum for outreach and broadening participation activities. Proposals requesting equipment, infrastructure or personnel that will also serve disciplines outside the Earth sciences may be jointly reviewed with other programs within the Foundation. EAR/IF will consider co-funding of projects with other NSF programs and other agencies. Potential applications who consider joint review a possibility for their proposal are encouraged to contact the relevant program officer to discuss this possibility.
Proposals accepted anytime.

Energy for Sustainability
The Energy for Sustainability program is part of the Chemical Process Systems cluster, which includes also 1) Catalysis; 2) Process Separations; and 3) Process Systems, Reaction Engineering, and Molecular Thermodynamics. The goal of the Energy for Sustainability program is to support fundamental engineering research that will enable innovative processes for the sustainable production of electricity and fuels, and for energy storage. Processes for sustainable energy production must be environmentally benign, reduce greenhouse gas production, and utilize renewable resources. Research projects that stress molecular level understanding of phenomena that directly impacts key barriers to improved system level performance (e.g. energy efficiency, product yield, process intensification) are encouraged. Proposed research should be inspired by the need for economic and impactful conversion processes. All proposals should include in the project description, how the proposed work, if successful, will improve process realization and economic feasibility and compare the proposed work against current state-of-the-art. Highly integrated multidisciplinary projects are encouraged.
Oct. 22, 2018

Energy, Power, Control, and Networks (EPCN)
Recent advances in communications, computation, and sensing technologies offer unprecedented opportunities for the design of cyber-physical systems with increased responsiveness, interconnectivity and automation. To meet new challenges and societal needs, the Energy, Power, Control and Networks (EPCN) Program invests in systems and control methods for analysis and design of cyber-physical systems to ensure stability, performance, robustness, and security. Topics of interest include modeling, optimization, learning, and control of networked multi-agent systems, higher-level decision making, and dynamic resource allocation as well as risk management in the presence of uncertainty, sub-system failures and stochastic disturbances. EPCN also invests in adaptive dynamic programing, brain-like networked architectures performing real-time learning, and neuromorphic engineering. EPCN supports innovative proposals dealing with systems research in such areas as energy, transportation, and nanotechnology. EPCN places emphasis on electric power systems, including generation, transmission, storage, and integration of renewables; power electronics and drives; battery management systems; hybrid and electric vehicles; and understanding of the interplay of power systems with associated regulatory and economic structures and with consumer behavior. Also of interest are interdependencies of power and energy systems with other critical infrastructures. Topics of interest also include systems analysis and design for energy scavenging and alternate energy technologies such as solar, wind, and hydrokinetic. The program also supports innovative tools and test beds, as well as curriculum development integrating research and education. In addition to single investigator projects, EPCN encourages cross-disciplinary proposals that benefit from active collaboration of researchers with complementary skills. Proposals for the EPCN program may involve collaborative research to capture the breadth of expertise needed for such multidisciplinary integrative activities. ECCS will consider supporting a limited number of small team proposals of three or more Investigators from different disciplines and/or universities.
Nov. 1, 2018

Environmental Chemical Sciences
The Environmental Chemical Sciences (ECS) Program supports experimental and computational research on the fundamental chemistry of processes in the environment. Recognizing the intrinsic complexity and heterogeneity of environmental systems, projects develop and utilize advanced experimental, modeling and simulation approaches to discover, explain, and predict environmental phenomena. Topics may include, but are not limited to: processes occurring at environmental interfaces and the chemical behavior and transformation under a variety of naturally occurring environmental conditions. Submissions that address national needs for sustainability are particularly encouraged. Examples of sustainable chemistry appropriate for the ECS Program include, but are not limited to: proposals that consider the nexus of food, energy, and water sustainability especially as related to nitrogen and phosphorus cycling. Field measurements and instrument development in support of environmental measurements are not supported. Programs in other NSF Directorates and other Federal Agencies address aspects such as field studies, large-scale models of the environment, toxicity studies, industrial processes, remediation methods, and the behavior and fate of nanoparticles in the environment.
Oct. 31, 2018

Environmental Engineering
The Environmental Engineering program is part of the Environmental Engineering and Sustainability cluster, which includes also 1) Environmental Sustainability; and 2) Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials. The goal of the Environmental Engineering program is to support transformative research which applies scientific and engineering principles to avoid or minimize solid, liquid, and gaseous discharges, resulting from human activities on land, inland and coastal waters, and air, while promoting resource and energy conservation and recovery. The program also fosters cutting-edge scientific research for identifying, evaluating, and monitoring the waste assimilative capacity of the natural environment and for removing or reducing contaminants from polluted air, water, and soils. Any proposal investigating sensors, materials or devices that does not integrate these products with an environmental engineering activity or area of research may be returned without review.
Oct. 22,2 018

Environmental Sustainability
The goal of the Environmental Sustainability program is to promote sustainable engineered systems that support human well-being and that are also compatible with sustaining natural (environmental) systems. These systems provide ecological services vital for human survival. Research efforts supported by the program typically consider long time horizons and may incorporate contributions from the social sciences and ethics. The program supports engineering research that seeks to balance society's need to provide ecological protection and maintain stable economic conditions.
Oct. 1, 2018

FY 2015 Sustainable Chemistry, Engineering and Materials (SusChEM) Funding Opportunity NSF 14-077
In fiscal year (FY) 2013, NSF started an initiative to encourage and foster research in Sustainable Chemistry, Engineering, and Materials (SusChEM), partially in response to the mandate of the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010. The SusChEM initiative addresses the interrelated challenges of sustainable supply, engineering, production, and use of chemicals and materials. In FY 2015, the participating divisions are Chemistry (CHE); Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems (CBET); Materials Research (DMR); Earth Sciences (EAR); and the Materials Engineering and Processing program in the Division of Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation (CMMI).
Varied.

GeoPRISMS NSF 18-559
GeoPRISMS (Geodynamic Processes at Rifting and Subducting Margins) Program investigates the coupled geodynamics, earth surface processes, and climate interactions that build and modify continental margins over a wide range of timescales. These interactions cross the shoreline and have applications to margin evolution and dynamics, construction of stratigraphic architecture, accumulation of economic resources, and associated geologic hazards and environmental management. The GeoPRISMS Program includes two broadly integrated science initiatives (Subduction Cycles and Deformation (SCD) and Rift Initiation and Evolution (RIE)), linked by five overarching scientific topics and themes, where transformative advances are likely to occur in the decade 2011-2020, and where a focused scientific program could be most effective. These overarching science topics include 1) Origin and evolution of continental crust; 2) Fluids, magmas and their interactions; 3) Climate-surface-tectonics feedbacks; 4) Geochemical cycles; and 5) Plate boundary deformation and geodynamics. Each of the initiatives has identified primary sites for focused investigations, as well as thematic studies that will complement primary site studies. The GeoPRISMS Office, supported separately by an award to Pennsylvania State University, is tasked with community outreach and engagement through conferences, meetings, and maintenance of a website. More information about the function of the national office can be found here: http://geoprisms.org/about/organization/
August 13, 2018

Grant Opportunities for Academic Liaison with Industry - NSF 12-513
Grant Opportunities for Academic Liaison with Industry (GOALI) promotes university-industry partnerships by making project funds or fellowships/traineeships available to support an eclectic mix of industry-university linkages. Special interest is focused on affording the opportunity for: Faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and students to conduct research and gain experience in an industrial setting; Industrial scientists and engineers to bring industry's perspective and integrative skills to academe; and Interdisciplinary university-industry teams to conduct research projects. This solicitation targets high-risk/high-gain research with a focus on fundamental research, new approaches to solving generic problems, development of innovative collaborative industry-university educational programs, and direct transfer of new knowledge between academe and industry. GOALI seeks to fund transformative research that lies beyond that which industry would normally fund.
Proposals Accepted Anytime

Humans, Disasters, and the Built Environment
The Humans, Disasters and the Built Environment (HDBE) program supports fundamental, multidisciplinary research on the interactions between humans and the built environment within and among communities exposed to natural, technological and other types of hazards and disasters. The program's context is provided by ongoing and emerging changes in three interwoven elements of a community: its population, its built environment (critical infrastructures, physical and virtual spaces, and buildings and related structures) and the hazards and disasters to which it is exposed. The HDBE program seeks research that integrates these elements and that can contribute to theories that hold over a broad range of scales and conditions. Examples include but are not limited to unified frameworks and theoretical models that encompass non-hazard to extreme hazard and disaster conditions, theoretical and empirical studies that consider how interactions between a community's population and its built environment may suppress or amplify hazard exposure or its effects, and studies that seek to inform scholarship through the development of shared data and related resources. In these and other areas funded through the HDBE program, research that challenges conventional wisdom on the interactions among humans, the built environment and hazards and disasters is particularly encouraged. Given the richness of the phenomena under study, the HDBE program seeks research that advances theories, methods and data within and across diverse disciplines, whether in engineering, the social sciences, computing or other relevant fields. Ultimately, research funded through this program is expected to inform how communities can cultivate and engage a broad range of physical, social and other resources to ensure improved quality of life for their inhabitants.
Sept. 17, 2018

Humans, Disasters, and the Built Environment (HDBE)
The Humans, Disasters and the Built Environment (HDBE) program supports fundamental, multidisciplinary research on the interactions between humans and the built environment within and among communities exposed to natural, technological and other types of hazards and disasters. The program's context is provided by ongoing and emerging changes in three interwoven elements of a community: its population, its built environment (critical infrastructures, physical and virtual spaces, and buildings and related structures) and the hazards and disasters to which it is exposed. The HDBE program seeks research that integrates these elements and that can contribute to theories that hold over a broad range of scales and conditions. Examples include but are not limited to unified frameworks and theoretical models that encompass non-hazard to extreme hazard and disaster conditions, theoretical and empirical studies that consider how interactions between a community's population and its built environment may suppress or amplify hazard exposure or its effects, and studies that seek to inform scholarship through the development of shared data and related resources. In these and other areas funded through the HDBE program, research that challenges conventional wisdom on the interactions among humans, the built environment and hazards and disasters is particularly encouraged. Given the richness of the phenomena under study, the HDBE program seeks research that advances theories, methods and data within and across diverse disciplines, whether in engineering, the social sciences, computing or other relevant fields. Ultimately, research funded through this program is expected to inform how communities can cultivate and engage a broad range of physical, social and other resources to ensure improved quality of life for their inhabitants.
Proposals accepted anytime.

Humans, Disasters, and the Built Environment (HDBE) PD 17-1638
The Humans, Disasters and the Built Environment (HDBE) program supports fundamental, multidisciplinary research on the interactions between humans and the built environment within and among communities exposed to natural, technological and other types of hazards and disasters. The program's context is provided by ongoing and emerging changes in three interwoven elements of a community: its population, its built environment (critical infrastructures, physical and virtual spaces, and buildings and related structures) and the hazards and disasters to which it is exposed. The HDBE program seeks research that integrates these elements and that can contribute to theories that hold over a broad range of scales and conditions. Examples include but are not limited to unified frameworks and theoretical models that encompass non-hazard to extreme hazard and disaster conditions, theoretical and empirical studies that consider how interactions between a community's population and its built environment may suppress or amplify hazard exposure or its effects, and studies that seek to inform scholarship through the development of shared data and related resources. In these and other areas funded through the HDBE program, research that challenges conventional wisdom on the interactions among humans, the built environment and hazards and disasters is particularly encouraged. Given the richness of the phenomena under study, the HDBE program seeks research that advances theories, methods and data within and across diverse disciplines, whether in engineering, the social sciences, computing or other relevant fields. Ultimately, research funded through this program is expected to inform how communities can cultivate and engage a broad range of physical, social and other resources to ensure improved quality of life for their inhabitants.
September 17, 2018

Innovations at the Nexus of Food, Energy and Water Systems (INFEWS) N
The INFEWS program seeks to support research that conceptualizes FEW systems broadly and inclusively, incorporating social and behavioral processes (such as decision making and governance), physical processes (such as built infrastructure and new technologies for more efficient resource utilization), natural processes (such as biogeochemical and hydrologic cycles), biological processes (such as agroecosystem structure and productivity), and cyber-components (such as sensing, networking, computation and visualization for decision-making and assessment). Investigations of these complex systems may produce discoveries that cannot emerge from research on food or energy or water systems alone. It is the synergy among these components in the context of sustainability that will open innovative science and engineering pathways to produce new knowledge, novel technologies, and innovative predictive capabilities.
September 26th, 2018

Innovative Corps- National Innovation Networks Teams Program (I-CorpsTM Teams) NSF 17-559
The National Science Foundation (NSF) seeks to develop and nurture a national innovation ecosystem that builds upon fundamental research to guide the output to facilitate the application of scientific discoveries closer to the development of technologies, products and processes that benefit society. In order to maintain, strengthen and grow a national innovation ecosystem, NSF has established the Innovation Corps - National Innovation Network Teams Program (I-Corps Teams). The NSF I-Corps Teams Program purpose is to identify NSF-funded researchers who will receive additional support in the form of entrepreneurial education, mentoring and funding to accelerate innovation that can attract subsequent third-party funding. The purpose of the NSF I-Corps Teams grant is to give the project team access to resources to help determine the readiness to transition technology developed by previously-funded or currently funded NSF projects. The outcomes of I-Corps Teams projects will be threefold: 1) a clear go /or no go decision regarding viability of products and services, 2) should the decision be to move the effort forward, a transition plan for those projects to move forward, and 3) a definition of a compelling technology demonstration for potential partners.
Submitted any time.

Integrated Earth Systems (IES)
The Earth consists of a variety of complex systems that are variable over space and time, and respond to a wide range of perturbations. The goal of the Integrated Earth Systems (IES) program is to investigate the interplay among the continental, terrestrial, and interior systems of the planet. The program provides an opportunity for collaborative, multidisciplinary research into the operation, dynamics, and complexity of Earth systems that encompass the core of the Earth through the surface. Innovative projects that explore new research directions beyond those typically considered by core programs of the Division of Earth Sciences (EAR) are encouraged. Investigations may include all or part of the continental, terrestrial and deep Earth at all temporal and spatial scales. IES will support topics that include (but are not limited to) continental systems; terrestrial or surficial Earth systems including physical, chemical, and biotic dimensions; linkages among tectonics, climate, and landscape evolution; the coupling of the Earth's climate, depositional and biotic systems; and global cycles that involve core and mantle processes.
November 14th, 2018

NSF Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Program (S-STEM)
Recognizing that financial aid alone cannot increase retention and graduation in STEM, the program provides awards to Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs) to fund scholarships and to advance the adaptation, implementation, and study of effective evidence-based curricular and co-curricular activities that support recruitment, retention, transfer (if appropriate), student success, academic/career pathways, and graduation in STEM. The S-STEM program encourages collaborations among different types of partners: Partnerships among different types of institutions; collaborations of STEM faculty and institutional, educational, and social science researchers; and partnerships among institutions of higher education and local business and industry, if appropriate.
March 27, 2019

NSF/FDA Scholar-in-Residence at FDA - NSF 10-533
The National Science Foundation (NSF), through the Directorate for Engineering's Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems (CBET), and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), through its Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) have established the NSF/FDA Scholar-in-Residence Program at FDA. This program comprises an interagency partnership for the investigation of scientific and engineering issues concerning emerging trends in medical device technology. This partnership is designed to enable investigators in science, engineering, and mathematics to develop research collaborations within the intramural research environment at the FDA. This solicitation features four flexible mechanisms for support of research at the FDA: 1) Faculty at FDA; 2) Graduate Student Fellowships; 3) Postdoctoral Fellowships; and, 4) Undergraduate Student Research Experiences. Undergraduate student participants supported with NSF funds must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States.
Proposals accepted anytime

NSF: Developing Country Collaborations in Plant Genome Research (DCC-PGR) (04-563)
The intent of DCC-PGR awards is to support collaborative research linking US researchers with partners from developing countries to solve problems of mutual interest in agriculture, energy, and the environment, while placing US and international researchers at the center of a global network of scientific excellence. The long-term goal of these collaborative research efforts is a greater and sustained engagement with developing countries in plant biotechnology research. In order to realize the full potential of biotechnology for the developing world, the technology must target crops grown locally in the developing countries and the traits that are most relevant to the local farmers and consumers.
Proposals accepted anytime

NSF: Environmental Sustainaibility PD 17-7643
The goal of the Environmental Sustainability program is to promote sustainable engineered systems that support human well-being and that are also compatible with sustaining natural (environmental) systems. These systems provide ecological services vital for human survival. Research efforts supported by the program typically consider long time horizons and may incorporate contributions from the social sciences and ethics. The program supports engineering research that seeks to balance society's need to provide ecological protection and maintain stable economic conditions. The four principal research areas are: 1) Industrial Ecology (advancements in modeling such as life cycle assessment, materials flow analysis, and input/output economic models); 2) Green Engineering (advancement of the sustainability of manufacturing processes, green buildings, and infrastructure); 3) Ecological Engineering (engineering aspects of restoring ecological function to natural systems); and 4) Earth Systems Engineering (engineering that considers aspects of large scale engineering research that involve mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions, adaptation to climate change, and other global scale concerns).
Oct. 1, 2018

Paleo Perspectives on Climate Change (P2C2)
The goal of research funded under the interdisciplinary P2C2 solicitation is to utilize key geological, chemical, atmospheric (gas in ice cores), and biological records of climate system variability to provide insights into the mechanisms and rate of change that characterized Earth's past climate variability, the sensitivity of Earth's climate system to changes in forcing, and the response of key components of the Earth system to these changes. Important scientific objectives of P2C2 are to: 1) provide comprehensive paleoclimate data sets that can serve as model test data sets analogous to instrumental observations; and 2) enable transformative syntheses of paleoclimate data and modeling outcomes to understand the response of the longer-term and higher magnitude variability of the climate system that is observed in the geological and cryospheric records.
Oct. 22, 2018

Paleoclimate - NSF PD 98-1530
Supports research on the natural evolution of Earth's climate with the goal of providing a baseline for present variability and future trends through improved understanding of the physical, chemical, and biological processes that influence climate over the long-term. The Geosciences Directorate and the Office of Polar Programs have joined in creating the annual Paleo Perspectives on Climate Change (P2C2) (http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5750) competition in paleoclimate global change research. Researchers are encouraged to consider the P2C2 competition as a possible source of support for their global change research. Since proposals eligible for funding in the P2C2 competition are not eligible for funding in the Paleoclimate Program, researchers are strongly advised to contact the Director of the Paleoclimate Program for guidance as to the suitability of their proposed research for either program.
Proposals welcome at any time during the year but, investigators are encouraged to submit proposals early in the fiscal year. Proposals to the P2C2 competition must adhere to the current deadline.

Physical Oceanography PD 98-1610
Physical Oceanography PD 98-1610 The Physical Oceanography Program supports research on a wide range of topics associated with the structure and movement of the ocean, with the way in which it transports various quantities, with the way the ocean's physical structure interacts with the biological and chemical processes within it, and with interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere, solid earth and ice that surround it.
Aug. 15, 2018

Prediction of and Resilience against Extreme Events (PREEVENTS)
PREEVENTS seeks projects that will (1) enhance understanding of the fundamental processes underlying natural hazards and extreme events on various spatial and temporal scales, as well as the variability inherent in such hazards and events, and (2) improve our capability to model and forecast such hazards and events. All projects requesting PREEVENTS support must be primarily focused on these two targets. In addition, PREEVENTS projects will improve our understanding of the effects of natural hazards and extreme events and will enable development, with support by other programs and organizations, of new tools to enhance societal preparedness and resilience against such impacts.
Jan. 4, 2019

Research Coordination Networks - NSF RCN 13-520 replaces 11-531
The goal of the RCN program is to advance a field or create new directions in research or education by supporting groups of investigators to communicate and coordinate their research, training and educational activities across disciplinary, organizational, geographic and international boundaries. RCN provides opportunities to foster new collaborations, including international partnerships, and address interdisciplinary topics. RCN supports the means by which investigators can share information and ideas, coordinate ongoing or planned research activities, foster synthesis and new collaborations, develop community standards, and in other ways advance science and education through communication and sharing of ideas. Proposed networking activities directed to the RCN program should focus on a theme to give coherence to the collaboration, such as a broad research question or particular technologies or approaches.
Proposals Accepted Anytime: General (non-targeted) RCN proposals should be submitted to a participating program. Refer to the specific program website for submission dates.

Science of Learning Centers (SLC) - NSF PD 07-7278
The Science of Learning Centers program (SLC) offers awards for large-scale, long-term Centers that create the intellectual, organizational and physical infrastructure needed for the long-term advancement of Science of Learning research. It supports research that harnesses and integrates knowledge across multiple disciplines to create a common groundwork of conceptualization, experimentation and explanation that anchor new lines of thinking and inquiry towards a deeper understanding of learning. The Program is currently only accepting proposals for Workshops, EArly-concept Grants for Exploratory Research (EAGER), Rapid Response Grants (RAPID), and Supplements to NSF awards (including those funded by other programs).
Full proposals accepted anytime

Thwaites: The Future of Thwaites Glacier and its Contribution to Sea-level Rise
The program will have a direct and significant impact on understanding the stability of marine ice sheets and specifically the West Antarctic Ice Sheet in the vicinity of Thwaites Glacier, and will contribute to the ice-sheet modeling community capability to simulate ice sheets and to reduce the uncertainties in sea-level projections. In addition, the program will contribute to improving risk assessments that coastal communities need for decisions about adaptation and long-range planning.
None.

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USAID

7200AA18R00032 Feed the Future Global Food Security BAA Agency for International Development
USAID is issuing this Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) to invite participants to co-create, co-design, co-invest, and collaborate on innovative research and development (R&D) interventions to address challenges to global food security. USAID's Bureau for Food Security (BFS) is seeking R&D to develop new and innovative approaches to enhance agricultural systems and rural development through well-integrated interventions that empower youth and foster improved gender dynamics, particularly in the areas of: 1) Inclusive and sustainable agriculture-led economic growth; 2) Strengthened resilience among people and systems, especially to new and recurrent shocks and stresses; and 3) A well-nourished population, especially women and children. See the attached solicitation for details on the BAA process and requirements. Questions Due: April 12, 2018 10:00 AM ET (Washington DC Time); Expressions of Interest Submissions Due: April 23, 2018 12:00 PM ET (Washington DC Time). Send Questions and EOI Submissions to FTFBAA@usaid.gov;
March 28, 2019

Landscape Conservation in Western Tanzania Activity Agency for International Development 720-621-18-RFA-00003
The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) is seeking applications for a cooperative agreement from qualified U.S. and Non-U.S. organizations to fund a program entitled "Landscape Conservation in Western Tanzania." Eligibility for this award is not restricted.
August 10, 2018

Research and Innovation for Health Supply Chain Systems and Commodity Security
The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) is seeking concept papers form qualified applicants. The purpose of this APS is to announce the intention of the United States Government (USG) to fund a limited number of awards through the USAID, Global Health Bureau to support research on a focused set of health supply chain systems and related commodity security issues in low and middle income countries. This APS provides prospective applicants with a fair opportunity to develop and submit competitive applications to USAID for potential funding.
May 29, 2019

USAID/Brazil Partnership to Conserve Amazon Biodiversity BAA-BCA-BRAZIL-2015
This Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) seeks opportunities to co-create, co-design, co- invest, and collaborate in the development, piloting, and scaling of practical and cost-effective innovations that will help address critical challenges in biodiversity conservation in the Amazon. The United States Agency for International Development (USAID), in cooperation with the Government of Brazil (GOB), invites organizations and companies to participate with USAID, in cooperation with its partners, in response to Critical Conservation Challenge Addenda issued under this BAA, to provide innovations, and technologies that further USAID's Development Objective of Enhanced Biodiversity Conservation for Brazilian Amazonian Protected Areas Systems.
No closing date

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Other

APA: International Scientific Meeting Support Award
This fund typically provides grants of $500-$1,000 in support of international scientific meetings. Funds may be used for activities associated with scientific meetings such as the following. Priority will be given to high-impact, specific activities over support to a "general fund" for specific targets: • Scientific meeting organizing expenses (e.g., printing, postage, supplies). • Scholarships for travel and/or registration for targeted groups (e.g., students, special speakers, presenters from a transitional or a developing country). • Support for special events associated with a scientific meeting (e.g., historical exhibits). • Social or cultural events associated with a meeting. • Funds may be used to support planning activities in years prior to the conference year.
March 15, 2019

CDC-RFA-DP18-1813 Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control - NCCDPHP
CDC announces the availability of fiscal year 2018 (FY18) funds to implement DP18-1813 Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH). This 5-year initiative is to improve health, prevent chronic diseases, and reduce health disparities among racial and ethnic populations with the highest risk, or burden, of chronic disease, specifically for African Americans/Blacks, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islanders, American Indians, and Alaska Natives, by: Supporting culturally tailored interventions to address the preventable health behaviors of tobacco use, poor nutrition and physical inactivity Linking community and clinical efforts to increase access to health care and preventive care programs at the community level Supporting implementation, evaluation and dissemination of practice- and evidence-based strategies on the four topic areas of tobacco, nutrition, physical activity, and community-clinical collaborations that ultimately lead to reduced health disparities in chronic conditions of hypertension, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, and obesity Funding will support recipients that: Have a history of successfully working with an established community coalition to address issues relating to health or other disparities. Select strategies that address the health disparities in the community based on results from a community health needs assessment process. Have organizational capacity to effectively, efficiently, and immediately implement locally tailored evidence- and practice-based strategies
July 16, 2018

Environmental Governance in U.S. Free Trade Agreement Countries Department of State Bureau of Oceans - Int. Environmental - Scientific SFOP0005215
The purpose of this project is to improve environmental governance, particularly to address the challenges of air pollution, water, and waste management. The goal is to improve the regulatory and enforcement environment resulting in the creation or strengthening of environmental policies, or promote the adoption of environmental technologies or practices in Morocco , Jordan, Oman, Panama, Peru, Colombia, Chile, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, and/or Honduras.
Aug. 2, 2018

Fisheries Management and Governance in U.S. Free Trade Agreement Countries Department of State Bureau of Oceans - Int. Environmental - Scientific SFOP0005214
OES will award one cooperative agreement of up to $500,000 U.S. Dollars (USD), or two cooperative agreements of up to $250,000 USD each in FY 2017 ESF to support fisheries management and governance in U.S. FTA countries, including by: 1) improving the science-based management of fisheries; 2) improving fisheries monitoring, control and surveillance (MCS) measures to ensure compliance with fisheries regulations; and 3) combating illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing, in particular by supporting vessel registry and fisheries information sharing systems.
July 28, 2018

HM0476-18-BAA-0001 National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Academic Research Program (NARP) Department of Defense National Geospatial Intelligence Agency
NGA welcomes all innovative ideas for path-breaking research that may advance the GEOINT mission. The NGA mission is to provide timely, relevant, and accurate geospatial intelligence (GEOINT) in support of national security objectives. GEOINT is the exploitation and analysis of imagery and geospatial information to describe, assess, and visually depict physical features and geographically referenced activities on the Earth. GEOINT consists of imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial information. NGA offers a variety of critical GEOINT products in support of U.S. national security objectives and Federal disaster relief, including aeronautical, geodesy, hydrographic, imagery, geospatial and topographical information. The NGA Academic Research Program (NARP) is focused on innovative, far-reaching basic and applied research in science, technology, engineering and mathematics having the potential to advance the GEOINT mission. The objective of the NARP is to support innovative, high-payoff research that provides the basis for revolutionary progress in areas of science and technology affecting the needs and mission of NGA. This research also supports the National System for Geospatial Intelligence (NSG), which is the combination of technology, systems and organizations that gather, produce, distribute and consume geospatial data and information. This research is aimed at advancing GEOINT capabilities by improving analytical methods, enhancing and expanding systems capabilities, and leveraging resources for common NSG goals. The NARP also seeks to improve education in scientific, mathematics, and engineering skills necessary to advance GEOINT capabilities. It is NGA's intent to solicit fundamental research under this BAA. Fundamental research means basic and applied research in science and engineering, the results of which ordinarily are published and shared broadly within the scientific community, as distinguished from proprietary research and from Industrial development, design, production, and product utilization, the results of which ordinarily are restricted for proprietary or national security reason. (National Security Decision Directive (NSDD) 189, National Policy on the Transfer of Scientific, Technical, and Engineering Information).NGA seeks proposals from eligible U.S. institutions for path-breaking GEOINT research in areas of potential interest to NGA, the DoD, and the Intelligence Community (IC).
December 31st, 2018

IDRC/CRDI: Developing innovative veterinary solutions for the fight against antimicrobial resistance
InnoVET-AMR seeks proposals for research that will develop innovative veterinary solutions focused on product development to reduce therapeutic and prevent non-therapeutic antimicrobial (AMR) use by farmers in developing countries. The program specifically focuses on reducing AMR in swine, poultry, and aquaculture animals. Eligible research teams should be working on veterinary solutions to reduce antimicrobial resistance (AMR) with a focus on poultry, swine, or aquaculture animals. At least one of the administering institutions should be based in a low or middle-income country (see the FAQs for a list of eligible countries).
September 12, 2018

Lower Mekong Initiative (LMI) Embassy Regional Grants Department of State U.S. Mission to Thailand EAP07272018
The U.S. Department of State Bureau of East Asia Pacific Affairs (EAP) announces an open competition for awards (from $15,000 up to $50,000) to support local and regional small-scale projects in eligible countries in Southeast Asia. Since fiscal year 2014, EAP has awarded and administered regional grants in the EAP region. These awards are funded through EAP Regional foreign assistance funds, and managed by the OES Regional Environment Officer (REO) posted in Bangkok.
July 27, 2018

North India Small Grants Program Department of State U.S. Mission to India ND-NOFO-18-117
The Public Affairs Section of the North India Office (PAS NIO) seeks project proposals for its “North India Small Grants Competition.” PAS NIO will select up to four proposals for funding of $15,000 each. Projects must take place in one or more of the following states and territories: Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Punjab, Chandigarh, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, and Uttarakhand. Projects may include, but are not limited to, workshops, cultural programs, exhibitions, hackathons, competitions, and outreach campaigns. Projects should demonstrate the innovative spirit of the United States and India, and must address one of the following priority areas: Environmental Sustainability (including renewable energy) Women's Economic Empowerment Entrepreneurship and Innovation Preventing Violent Extremism Countering Trafficking-in-Persons
July 23, 2018

NSF/FDA Scholar-in-Residence at FDA - NSF 10-533
The National Science Foundation (NSF), through the Directorate for Engineering's Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems (CBET), and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), through its Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) have established the NSF/FDA Scholar-in-Residence Program at FDA. This program comprises an interagency partnership for the investigation of scientific and engineering issues concerning emerging trends in medical device technology. This partnership is designed to enable investigators in science, engineering, and mathematics to develop research collaborations within the intramural research environment at the FDA. This solicitation features four flexible mechanisms for support of research at the FDA: 1) Faculty at FDA; 2) Graduate Student Fellowships; 3) Postdoctoral Fellowships; and, 4) Undergraduate Student Research Experiences. Undergraduate student participants supported with NSF funds must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States.
Proposals accepted anytime

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